Featured tree

This featured tree is an Indian Horse Chestnut

Aesculus indica, now in full flower and growing at the north east side of the lake. It is native to the Himalayas from Afghanistan and Pakistan to Western Nepal where it grows to an altitude of 3000m. The 'conkers' are used in traditional medicine and also as food for humans during times of food shortage.

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Park Trees


For more information about a particular tree find the number on the marker post beside that tree in the lists of trees below, scroll down and click on that number and that will take you to a tree card describing that tree:

Katy checks a tree info on her phone

Trees 101 - on    Click here
Trees 201 - on   Click here
Trees 301 - on    Click here
Trees 401 - on    Click here
Trees 501 - on    Click here
Trees 601 - on    Click here
Trees 701 - on    Click here

FoPP Chairman checks the tree QR codes FoPP Chairman checks the tree QR codes

Trees of the Park

For a number of years, the Friends have been planting  trees which are specimens of many varieties.  Under the expert eye of local tree specialist David Cornick, trees have been chosen to give colour, replace historical varieties and introduce new types to the Park. The marker post project sets out to list the different trees of the Park and to give you some information about them from the oldest tree which could well have been here when Paxton designed the Park right up to modern day additions.
We hope you find enjoyment in the trees of Princes Park.

Collins Tree Guide

The Friends of Princes Park are very grateful to our members who have created the above tree cards and to Harper Collins for their permission to reprint material from their excellent book - Collins Tree Guide. Please note that the tree card content is covered by licence and is not, therefore, available to copy, reprint or otherwise transmit. The licence is non-transferable. The Collins Tree Guide is available from Amazon  or locally from News from Nowhere.

As you will see from the tree map, we have colour coded the trees and numbered them in groups. You will find the colours refer to an area within the Park making it easier for you to navigate the tree cards on this site.

The Map key gives a list of the names (both common and scientific) of all the trees with marker posts and tree cards.

Community Environment Fund Team

The Friends of Princes Park are grateful for  funding from the Community Environment Fund Team which has enabled this project to go ahead.